Ubuntu Edge

Historical froof of demand for convergence and freedom
5 August 2017

 
 

Albeit a quick blip on the radar of tech history, it could be argued that the Ubuntu Edge Project was absolute proof that the world of computing had completed a revolution.

Some viewed the project as a failure merely because it didn't reach its goal of raising $32 million dollars via crowdfunding on IndieGoGo.  These naysayers were of the opinion that because it "only" raised $12 million (note that the Wikipedia page above also uses "only") it was, therefore, a failure.  However, it must be noted that this assertion is absolutely incorrect.

The Ubuntu Edge project was, in fact, one of the greatest success stories to hit the very few media sources it did and it should not be considered surprising that this story barely scraped the corner of mainstream media when one considers just how disruptive this project would have been to Goliaths like Apple.  

 Well over 5500 people not only claimed to support the development of this unique device but also opened their wallet and were willing to pay for it.  Anyone who has tried to fundraise for business or non-profit will agree that until someone is willing to pay, it is nothing more that the proverbial pie in the sky.

Further, anyone who has attempted to raise money will quickly tell you that it is very difficult to raise even $100,000 - even $50,000 -  unless your business plan is unbeatable and sitting in a sector which has a low chance of failure.  

Ubuntu Edge had neither.  It was simply a concept presented and the people wanted it.  

And they still want it real bad.

But don't believe a blogger, do your own survey.  Ask your friends and family and co-workers if they would like to own a device that will effectively wipe out the need to own three sizes of tablets, the latest smartphone, a smart TV, a laptop, and desktop.  

The concept of 'convergence' was the secret sauce that made Ubuntu Edge so exciting.  It made the dream of simplifying our tech a near reality. It was so close we could taste it. 

Ubuntu Edge was way ahead of its time as Ubuntu always is.  

Ubuntu Edge may not have materialized into the proposed device it was supposed to, but the people and the community it inspired live on today in the resurgence of UBports Community, Project Halium and Yunit.

If you have ever dreamed of having this one-device-does-all that respects your privacy and is built by the community, why not get involved?  You don't have to be a programmer or know anything at all for that matter.  You just have to be excited, and share that excitement with others.